The Bone Season (The Bone Season #1) by Samantha Shannon
Published August 20th 2013 by Bloomsbury USA
Source: Purchased
Rating: dnf

The year is 2059. Nineteen-year-old Paige Mahoney is working in the criminal underworld of Scion London, based at Seven Dials, employed by a man named Jaxon Hall. Her job: to scout for information by breaking into people’s minds. For Paige is a dreamwalker, a clairvoyant and, in the world of Scion, she commits treason simply by breathing.

It is raining the day her life changes for ever. Attacked, drugged and kidnapped, Paige is transported to Oxford – a city kept secret for two hundred years, controlled by a powerful, otherworldly race. Paige is assigned to Warden, a Rephaite with mysterious motives. He is her master. Her trainer. Her natural enemy. But if Paige wants to regain her freedom she must allow herself to be nurtured in this prison where she is meant to die.

I felt like I was drowning.

The Bone Season was quite possibly my most anticipated book of 2013. Granted, that was years ago and my reading tastes could’ve changed, but I was really, really, really looking forward to it. There was so much hype from so many people I share similar tastes with, and the blurb had me at “criminal underworld.” That’s probably where things started going wrong.

Thing is, The Bone Season starts out perfectly fine. There might be one too many characters to keep track of at first, but it’s not bothersome. Paige, while nothing outstanding, is a character that I’d be comfortable enough to spend the book’s 500-or-so pages with. Then things kicked off – dangerous, criminal underworldly events that got me really excited, and I remember telling my friend who had gifted me the book that things were getting really good and I was starting to really love it. Famous last words, right?

Flash forward a handful of pages and the book does a complete 360. No more criminal underworld. Goodbye to the life vest and flotation device – a couple chapters in, Paige wakes up in a completely different place, and it seems as if the author just discarded the first part and restarted. The Bone Season drop kicks you off the cliff, and it’s all downhill from there.

The world-building is everywhere and nowhere all at once, and I found myself constantly flipping back to the glossary at the beginning, and still completely and utterly confused. Information comes in huge, indigestible glops, the breaks between which are just as massive, and it’s amazes me how something can be so simultaneously vague and intricate. The Bone Season really doesn’t do anything half-assed.

Somewhere between the realization that you could pretty much kill off any character, Paige included, and I wouldn’t be able to care less, and the awkward budding of romance that had no basis upon which to exist, I gave up and set the book aside, and I don’t think I’ll be continuing.

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